The Great Courses: Skeptics and Belivers: Religious Debate in the Western Intellectual Tradition

The Great Courses: Skeptics and  Belivers: Religious Debate in the Western Intellectual Tradition - Tyler Roberts System of thought must be consistent, coherent and non-contradictory in order to pass the minimum standard of believability. But, any such system that has those three characteristics will also be incomplete, not able to show its consistency and suffer from the halting problem. This series of lectures makes the mistake of offering the discussion within the context of the system under consideration (namely a belief in religion and god and faith and Jesus and so on). It's as if the lecture was written by a series of "UFO experts" and each expert was telling you why the other expert is incomplete in his proper belief in the UFO, after all he doesn't believe in Elvis as an alien and his system isn't right because of that lack of belief. The only way to realize that alien abduction is hokum is to step out from the system under consideration and ask where is the physical evidence for the statement and why should I believe in it instead of not believing because the burden of prove is on the assertion.

Don't get me wrong, this lecture is good and comprehensive. He starts by showing the reason for the significance for the enlightenment (the start of modernity) and then spends the rest of the lecture showing post-modern criticism for that period. As for me, everything I read about the universe and our place in it is driven by two things, 1) understand entropy (the second law) and you'll understand physics and 2) understand the age enlightenment and you'll understand our place in the universe. He seems to not embrace the age of enlightenment to the same degree that I do.